Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Managing Forecasting the Life of a Mass Concrete Structure

News & Views, Volume 51 | Forecasting the Life of a Mass Concrete Structure, Part One

A CASE STUDY FROM THE FERMILAB LONG BASELINE FACILITY

By:  Keith Kubischta and Andy Coughlin, PE, SE

Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Managing Forecasting the Life of a Mass Concrete Structure

All around us is aging concrete infrastructure. From the dams holding back water, to the nuclear power plants creating carbon free electricity, to the foundations of our homes and offices. Though many advances have been made in the design of concrete structures, how do we know these structures will stand the test of time. Can we see the future of a concrete structure? Can we know the damage built into a structure during construction, normal life, and extreme events?
Answer:  Yes we can.

Background

In Batavia, Illinois a facility being built that is the first of its kind in the world. Fermilab’s Long Baseline Neutrino Facility will accelerate protons using electromagnets up to incredible speeds in a particle accelerator. After traveling through the campus, the particles are redirected to a graphite target where the collision breaks them into their component particles: pions and muons. These components decay and are segregated off. What is left is believed to be the building blocks of the universe: neutrinos, which can pass undisturbed through matter. A beam of neutrinos passes through near detectors and travels over 800 miles underground to a detection facility in an old mineshaft at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, a facility that can also detect neutrinos hitting the earth from exploding stars.

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