PWR Operational Chemistry Training

EVENT DATE
Monday July, 25th – Friday July, 29th

DURATION
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

INDIVIDUAL PRICE
$2,200 (Includes light breakfast and lunch) Includes PWR Operational Chemistry Handbooks

LOCATION
Byron Nuclear Generating Station Training Facility
4450 North German Church Road, Byron, IL 61010 (Room 209)

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COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provides practical, hands-on information and techniques for personnel responsible for operational chemistry analysis, corrosion prevention, and system diagnostics. Attendees are encouraged to bring plant data for group discussion and analysis. Common topics will be covered as well as reactor coolant chemistry and radiochemistry, steam generator and balance of plant chemistry, demineralizer and filtration performance, start up and shutdown chemistry, corrosion concerns, and data evaluation techniques.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
Chemists and Engineers who desire a practical knowledge of primary and secondary operational water chemistry. This core course is designed for chemistry personnel that have a basic understanding of plant operation and plant systems, focusing on the essentials of primary and secondary operational water chemistry.

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SI Selected in The Corporate Magazine’s “Top 20 Most Dynamic Leaders”

The Corporate Magazine (www.thecorporatemagazine.com) approached us recently to be featured in their “Top 20 Most Dynamic Leaders” issue. We saw this as a unique opportunity to elevate our brand by briefly discussing our two-year journey under Mark, expanding on our history, highlighting our offerings, and sharing our unique value to the industries we serve.

To read the full article, click here.

Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Managing Forecasting the Life of a Mass Concrete Structure

News & Views, Volume 51 | Forecasting the Life of a Mass Concrete Structure, Part One

A CASE STUDY FROM THE FERMILAB LONG BASELINE FACILITY

By:  Keith Kubischta and Andy Coughlin, PE, SE

Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Managing Forecasting the Life of a Mass Concrete Structure

All around us is aging concrete infrastructure. From the dams holding back water, to the nuclear power plants creating carbon free electricity, to the foundations of our homes and offices. Though many advances have been made in the design of concrete structures, how do we know these structures will stand the test of time. Can we see the future of a concrete structure? Can we know the damage built into a structure during construction, normal life, and extreme events?
Answer:  Yes we can.

Background

In Batavia, Illinois a facility being built that is the first of its kind in the world. Fermilab’s Long Baseline Neutrino Facility will accelerate protons using electromagnets up to incredible speeds in a particle accelerator. After traveling through the campus, the particles are redirected to a graphite target where the collision breaks them into their component particles: pions and muons. These components decay and are segregated off. What is left is believed to be the building blocks of the universe: neutrinos, which can pass undisturbed through matter. A beam of neutrinos passes through near detectors and travels over 800 miles underground to a detection facility in an old mineshaft at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, a facility that can also detect neutrinos hitting the earth from exploding stars.

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Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Acoustic Emission Testing Streamlining Requalification of Heavy Lift Equipment

News & Views, Volume 51 | Acoustic Emission Testing

STREAMLINING REQUALIFICATION OF HEAVY LIFT EQUIPMENT

By:  Mike Battaglia and Jason Van Velsor

Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Acoustic Emission Testing Streamlining Requalification of Heavy Lift Equipment
Employing an advanced technique such as AE can significantly reduce the time required to perform this evolution, also reducing both the cost and dose associated with meeting the NUREG requirements.  

Background

Proper control of heavy loads is critical in any industrial application as faulty equipment or practices can have severe consequences.  The lifting technique, equipment, and operator qualifications must all meet or exceed applicable standards to ensure industrial safety.  The significance of heavy lifts at commercial nuclear facilities is, perhaps, even greater.  In addition to the consequences of an adverse event that are common to any industry (bodily injury or human fatality, equipment damage, etc.), the nuclear industry adds additional challenges.  Such an adverse event in the nuclear industry can also affect (depending on the specific lift) fuel geometry / criticality, system shutdown capability, damage to safety systems, etc.  One example of a critical lift in nuclear power facilities is the reactor vessel head / reactor internals lift.  

The requirement to inspect the heavy lifting equipment for structural integrity is prescribed in NUREG-0612, Control of Heavy Loads At Nuclear Power Plants, as enforced by NRC Generic Letter 81-07. The aforementioned NUREG document describes specific requirements for special lifting devices.  

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Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | High Temperature Ultrasonic Thickness Monitoring

News & Views, Volume 51 | High Temperature Ultrasonic Thickness Monitoring

TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION – THICK FILM SENSORS

By:  Jason Van Velsor and Robert ChambersStructural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | High Temperature Ultrasonic Thickness Monitoring

The ability to continuously monitor component thickness at high temperatures has many benefits in the power generation industry, as well as many other industries. Most significantly, it enables condition-based inspection and maintenance, as opposed to schedule-based, which assists plant management with optimizing operations and maintenance budgets and streamlining outage schedules. Furthermore, it can assist with the early identification of potential issues, which may be used to further optimize plant operations and provides ample time for contingency and repair planning.

Over the last several years, Structural Integrity has been working on the development of a real-time thickness monitoring technology that utilizes robust, unobtrusive, ultrasonic thick-film sensor technology that is enabling continuous operation at temperatures up to 800°F. 

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Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Selective Seam Weld Corrosion Engineering Critical Assessment

News & Views, Volume 51 | Selective Seam Weld Corrosion

ENGINEERING CRITICAL ASSESSMENT

By:  Pete Riccardella, Scott Riccardella and Chris TippleStructural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Selective Seam Weld Corrosion Engineering Critical Assessment

The Structural Integrity Associates, Inc. Oil and Gas Pipeline group recently supported an Engineering Critical Assessment to assist a pipeline operator manage the Selective Seam Weld Corrosion (SSWC) threat to an operating pipeline.  SSWC occurs when the fusion zone of a certain type of seam weld used in vintage (pre-1970) transmission pipelines experiences accelerated galvanic corrosion relative to the pipe body material.  It has led to numerous pipeline failures because the weld fusion zone often exhibits low fracture toughness.  The ECA included several technical advancements in applying fracture mechanics to this threat.

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Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Structural Integrity Associates | PEGASUS A Versatile Tool for Used Fuel Modeling

News & Views, Volume 51 | PEGASUS A Versatile Tool for Used Fuel Modeling

By:  Wenfeng Liu

PEGASUS, a finite element fuel code developed at SIA, represents a new modeling paradigm. This new paradigm treats all fuel behavior regimes in one continuous analysis.

Introduction
PEGASUS, a finite element fuel code developed at SIA, represents a new modeling paradigm.  This new paradigm treats all fuel behavior regimes in one continuous analysis.  This approach differs significantly from the current conservative practice of bounding analysis to ensure uncertainties are accounted for which results in sub-optimal used fuel management strategies.  Using PEGASUS in used fuel evaluation results in significant savings in engineering cost and work force utilization, reduces conservatism, and provides flexibility in the management of used fuel.

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Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Managing Piping Assets Software Automation

News & Views, Volume 51 | Managing Piping Assets

SOFTWARE AUTOMATIONStructural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Managing Piping Assets Software Automation

By:  Adam Roukema and Mark Jaeger

Driving Forces for Digital Transformations:
Paper Reduction (68%)
Online Training (54%)
Risk Management/Prediction (39%)
Social Media Integration (63%)
IT Automation (50%)

From Tech Pro Research, %’s reflect rate of respondents who believe digital transformation will significantly impact indicated categories

A fundamental tenant of engineering is that where inefficiencies exist, innovation is next.  This is especially true in the ongoing era of digital transformation, as software-based automation eliminates mundane, trivial tasks and enables increased focus on value-add activities.  A recent poll of workers in the tech industry found that 70% of their respective companies have either committed to or are developing a transformation strategy, with varying emphases (see sidebar).  The energy sector is no stranger to these innovations, and while the pace and scope of digital transformation may not appear to match that of driverless cars or moon rockets, its societal impacts are comparably widespread.

Historically, SI has been recognized as a leader in highly technical subject matter areas such as fracture mechanics, material degradation, and nondestructive examination.  In many cases, this expertise is aided by digital or software innovations that enable efficient data handling, novel computer aided visualizations, and dynamic performance of complex calculations.  In this vein, our MAPPro software is designed to aid in management of aging piping assets and has been an integral resource to the nuclear industry since its inception in 2009.

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News & Views, Volume 51 | Drone Inspections

SI EXPANDED CAPABILITIES

By:  Jason Van Velsor and Robert Chambers

The ability to continuously monitor component thickness at high temperatures has many benefits in the power generation industry, as well as many other industries. Most significantly, it enables condition-based inspection and maintenance, as opposed to schedule-based, which assists plant management with optimizing operations and maintenance budgets and streamlining outage schedules. Furthermore, it can assist with the early identification of potential issues, which may be used to further optimize plant operations and provides ample time for contingency and repair planning.

Over the last several years, Structural Integrity has been working on the development of a real-time thickness monitoring technology that utilizes robust, unobtrusive, ultrasonic thick-film sensor technology that is enabling continuous operation at temperatures up to 800°F.

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Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Turbine Unit Trip and Event

News & Views, Volume 51 | Turbine Unit Trip and Event

Recovery Best Practices

By:  Dan Tragresser

When a unit trips or experiences an event, the site will incur costs associated with the loss in production, regulatory penalties, and, if applicable, outage scope, hardware replacement, and the purchase of make-up power.  These costs can drive the priority of returning to service to quickly become the only priority.

Structural Integrity Associates | News and Views, Volume 51 | Turbine Unit Trip and EventWith the reduction in staffing at power plants over the past 2 decades, many traditionally routine engineering and maintenance tasks have fallen by the wayside.  With limited resources, operations and engineering personnel must focus their time and efforts based on priority.  Quite often, keeping a unit online or quickly returning a unit to service will take priority over continuous improvement actions such as investigations and root cause analysis.

When a unit trips or experiences an event, the site will incur costs associated with the loss in production, regulatory penalties, and, if applicable, outage scope, hardware replacement, and the purchase of make-up power.  These costs can drive the priority of returning to service to quickly become the only priority.  Unfortunately, the review of event operational data, event precursors, and the collecting evidence through the unit disassembly very often fall below the priority of returning to service.  Collecting or re-creating evidence after the fact is nearly impossible.  This lack of priority often results in a lack of understanding of the root cause of the trip or event.  

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